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Silicone band articles about companies / individuals who have used the silicone wristbands to raise funds for good causes.

Rascal Flatts to Hand Out 2,000 silicone Bracelets During Upcoming Persian Gulf USO Tour
Business Wire, August 3, 2005
OREM, Utah -- The Bands For Freedom Foundation Inc. today announced that they have given award-winning country music group Rascal Flatts 2,000 of the organization's "FREEDOM" patriotic silicone bracelets to take along with them as they depart for a USO tour of the Persian Gulf. Due to security precautions, the exact dates and locations of their visit are not being disclosed.

While on the USO tour, Rascal Flatts will be wearing the bands to show their support of the cause, as well as encouraging others to purchase and wear the bands. In addition, Rascal Flatts will distribute the bands to members of the military to serve as a keepsake and small token of their appreciation.

Commenting on Rascal Flatts and their support, Bands For Freedom Foundation Executive Director Andy Chudd remarked, "We are thrilled to have Rascal Flatts, currently the hottest group in country music, associated with our efforts to educate the public as to the special needs of our men and women in uniform, and their generosity in wearing the bands at their appearances and concerts has done a great deal to help us bring our message to their fans and friends about how to support our armed forces. In addition, their kindness in bringing a large number of bands along with them to distribute to the troops in the Persian Gulf is just another example of their enthusiastic support. Rascal Flatts is definitely a band for freedom."

Formed in December 2004, the Bands For Freedom Foundation Inc. was created to educate the public as to the special needs of our military personnel and their families, and to raise money to meet those needs. Through the sale of their enormously popular patriotic silicone wristbands marked with the word "FREEDOM," the Bands For Freedom Foundation Inc. allow Americans to make a respectful and unified statement honoring the men and women of the armed forces. All after-cost revenues from the sale of the wristbands are donated to the Armed Forces Relief Trust (AFRT) to help American soldiers and their families.




















Pastor: Stop complaining and get the bracelet
Oakland Tribune, May 5, 2007 by Maria Sudekum Fisher, Associated Press
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- Rev. Will Bowen tries not to complain. He wants everyone else to stop carping, too -- all 6 billion of us on the planet.

And his message, first preached in a sermon at his small suburban church, has caught on -- even though some critics note complaining serves an important function.

Last July, Bowen challenged worshippers at Christ Church Unity to quit complaining as a way to bring more prosperity into their lives. The congregation is part of the Association of Unity Churches, which offers what it calls practical Christianity -- a way of life leading to health, prosperity, happiness and peace of mind.

When you’re focusing your attention on what’s wrong or complaining, you’re going to get more of what you’re complaining about, Bowen says.

Positive thinking isn’t a new concept, but Bowens spin came with a contemporary twist: the silicone bracelet. At the July sermon, Bowen handed out about 250 purple bracelets he wanted his congregants to use to remind themselves to stop complaining, criticizing or gossiping. Sarcasm was another no-no.

He challenged them to refrain from complaining for 21 days because, he said, that’s how long it takes to break habits. Whenever they found themselves failing they were to switch the bracelet to the other wrist and start over.

Complaining draws all of its essence from negativity, the 47-year-old Bowen says. When you complain, you do it typically to attract attention or sympathy. Its you saying, There’s something wrong with me.

You’re sending out this vibrational energy into the universe that you’re a victim, and the universe responds with more negativity.

Bowen thought the challenge would be easy for him since he’s a positive minister guy. But he broke three bracelets after moving them from wrist to wrist so many times before making his 21 days. It took him nearly three months.

The bracelets and the no-complaining challenge were a hit with church members, who came back looking for more bracelets, which the church gives out free. People at their offices wanted them. Family, friends, students wanted the purple bracelet and to take the 21-day challenge.

By October, reporters came calling. After the initial burst of publicity, the church sent out more than 1 million free bracelets. Requests came in via the church’s Web site from around the world -- Russia, South America, Asian countries. Some Pentagon employees began using the bracelets, which they kept on their desks because they weren’t allowed to wear them, says Tom Alyea, a church board member who has been coordinating the no-complaining effort with Bowen.

When they find themselves complaining, they move the bracelet from one side of the desk to the other, Alyea said.

But Barbara Held, psychology professor at Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine, says Bowens approach is misguided. Complaining is an important, necessary tool for some people, she said.

If we lived in a world in which there was nothing to complain about I think it might make perfect sense, Held said. But we don’t.

Held, author of the book Stop Smiling, Start Kvetching: A 5-Step Guide to Creative Complaining, says people cope in different ways and some people need to vent. The tyranny of the positive attitude in America, which Reverend Bowen wants to spread to the entire world can actually hurt some people, she said.

The research is compelling. When you force people to use a coping style that goes against their nature their functioning goes down, she said. I’m not pushing pessimism. I’m saying let people cope in the way they cope and don’t make them feel defective.

Still, Bowens no complaining mission has resonated widely. He does several interviews a week and gets a lot of questions about what exactly constitutes complaining.

He explains it this way: Complaining is saying, Man, that sucks. What changes things is saying, This is not the way I would like it to be. This is how I would like it to be. Its painting a picture or creating a vista to get people to look in that direction. Its where you want to move toward.

Bowen attributes his campaigns appeal to people being tired of negativity, and to the changes he says people experience when they move away from complaining. Schools, prisons and homeless shelters have taken up the no complaint challenge, he said.

When you’re not articulating complaints then they have nowhere to go, and your brain literally stops producing them, and you become a happier person, he said.

Since Bowen’s appearance on The Oprah Winfrey Show in March, volunteers have taken orders for more than 4 million bracelets. They’ve been coming in to the Web site at about 1,000 a day, Alyea said.

The bracelets are free, but the church includes a donation envelope in each packet it sends out. Alyea has contacted some Web sites that have offered copycat Complaint Free World bracelets but laughs about another site that he says for $3 will send you a bracelet so you can complain all you want.

Bowen wont say how much the bracelets cost the church or what the donations amount to. But so far, contributions are keeping up with costs, he said.

A book, A Complaint Free World is due in October, and Bowens next goal is a nationwide No Complaining day, preferably the day before Thanksgiving.

Held likely wouldn't support that idea.

If they want to stop complaining and be optimistic and look on the bright side, fine, she said. But why cram the agenda down everybody’s throat? You don't see the kvetchers and complainers saying that everybody has to complain.


















Wear your heart on your wrist
Deseret News (Salt Lake City), Nov 11, 2004 by Tad Walch Deseret Morning News
OREM -- Livestrong.


Colored rubber wristbands engraved with poignant messages are the hot new American trend, raising money one dollar at a time for causes like cancer awareness, the searches for missing persons and U.S. soldiers and their families.

Psychologists say the bands also provide wearers another way to define themselves or to identify with a famous person or cause. That's why companies are racing to capitalize on the fad and become the first to market for-profit products, like BYU Cougars in dark blue and Utah Utes in crimson red.

Lance Armstrong and Nike unwittingly launched the social phenomenon this summer, even before Armstrong won his record- breaking sixth Tour de France wearing a yellow "LIVESTRONG" band. More than 20 million of the flexible silicone bracelets are in circulation worldwide and money raised goes to the Lance Armstrong Foundation for cancer awareness.

People who go to the trouble of tracking down and purchasing a wristband want to identify with a person or cause, according to Orem family psychologist Geret Giles.

"This is a phenomenon that probably falls within the category of branding," Giles said. "I believe wristbands are another way to help people define themselves. People assign certain values and abilities to Lance Armstrong. For a dollar, they can associate with him and borrow his image with the wristband."

Wristbands are big at several Utah high schools and junior highs, where teenagers feel the need for identity stronger than most.

"Those are the ages that are most brand-conscious," Giles said. "They're very aware of groups, cliques, social pressure and fashion."

Armstrong's success inspired the families of missing Brigham Young University student Brooke Wilberger (pink www.FINDBROOKE.com bands) and Elk Ridge teenager Garrett Bardsley (blue "FINDGARRETT" bands) to use the idea to solicit donations for the searches for their children.

A donor provided the Wilbergers with 20,000 wristbands. Those are nearly gone and the family has ordered another 25,000. The Bardsleys ordered 4,000 and have sold 3,500.

"The Wilberger and Bardsley wristbands send a message that I'm a compassionate person, I'm a socially aware person," Giles said. "It's cool, it's current, it's socially aware."

"When a soldier needs to come home for a funeral or a family emergency, he or she can turn to the AFRT for assistance in getting the needed funds," he said. "We are grateful for what our troops are doing in defending freedom and fighting terror, and we feel this is one way for us to show our thanks."

He predicts that the red, white and blue patriotic displays will prove more popular than the Livestrong message.

"I honestly believe when it's all said and done with these Freedom bands we'll sell more than Lance Armstrong," Cloward said.

Manufacturing and administrative costs will eat up about 30 to 35 percent of donations for the Freedom bands. The other 65 to 70 percent goes to the AFRT, which distributes 100 percent of funds it raises among the five branches of the military.

On the sports side, Fanzbanz sold out 500 Ute wristbands Saturday at Rice-Eccles Stadium and delivered 500 Cougar bands to the BYU Bookstore Wednesday.

The company also delivered bands stamped with "Bruins" to Orem's Mountain View High School this week.

All these trendy wristbands already have a counterculture counterpart. A black "Livewrong" band is available on eBay, marketed as an anti-trend, anti-establishment fashion statement.

Whatever the cause, message or hero behind the different rubber bands, they have gotten the attention of millions of Americans.

For 11-year-old Orem sixth-grader Sophie Siebach, her yellow Livestrong wristband is all about the cyclist who wears it.

"It shows that I like Lance Armstrong," she said. "He survived cancer and then won a bunch of Tours de France. My uncle had cancer and I think it's cool Lance Armstrong did that."




















NFL All-Stars Show Support for U.S. Troops by Sporting Bands For Freedom Silicone Wristbands
Business Wire, Feb 17, 2005
OREM, Utah -- Daunte Culpepper, Ahman Green, Michael Irvin, Terrell Owens and others voice their support for U.S. troops by wearing red, white and blue Bands For Freedom

Twenty NFL all-star football players showcased their support for members of the U.S. military by sporting red, white and blue silicone wristbands from the Bands For Freedom Foundation during the 2005 Pro Bowl and Pro Bowl festivities held last week in Honolulu.

These present and past National Football League all-stars have been added to the Bands For Freedom "Heroes Page" -- an online list of celebrity supporters of the U.S. troops via the Bands For Freedom Foundation and the Armed Forces Relief Trust fund (AFRT).

Recent additions to the NFL players highlighted on the "Heroes Page" showcasing their support for U.S. troops by wearing red, white and blue Bands For Freedom silicone wristbands include:

--Terrell Owens, all-everything wide receiver for the Philadelphia Eagles;

--Michael Irvin, all-star wide-out for the Dallas Cowboys and current ESPN analyst;

--Ahman Green, the Green Bay Packers' top-rated running back; and

--Quarterback Daunte Culpepper of the Minnesota Vikings.

Other NFL superstars who have now shown their support for the members of the U.S. military in their worldwide fight for freedom against terrorism by wearing Bands For Freedom silicone wristbands include:

--Sam Adams, the Buffalo Bills' 335-pound nose tackle;

--Steve Atwater, retired Pro Bowl safety for the Denver Broncos;

--Mitch Berger, New Orleans Saints' veteran punter;

--Kris Brown, current place-kicker for the Houston Texans;

--Mike Golic, nine-year veteran defensive tackle, current ESPN commentator and co-host of ESPN radio's "Mike and Mike in the Morning";

--Tony Gonzalez, the Kansas City Chiefs' all-star tight end;

--Ted Hendricks, eight-time Pro Bowl participant and Hall of Fame defensive end;

--Warren Moon, 18-year NFL quarterback for the Houston Oilers and a nine-time Pro Bowl quarterback;

--Mushin Muhammad, Carolina Panthers' most widely utilized receiver;

--Ed Reed, Baltimore Ravens' safety and 2004 NFL Defensive Player of the Year;

--Ike Reese, a first-time Pro Bowl selection and valued linebacker for the Philadelphia Eagles;

--Lito Sheppard, up-and-coming cornerback for the Eagles;

--Tra Thomas, the Eagles' three-time Pro Bowl offensive lineman; and

--Jeremiah Trotter, Philadelphia's physical and explosive middle linebacker.

The wristbands come in both youth and adult. Bands For Freedom wristbands are similar to those made popular by the Lance Armstrong Wear Yellow Live Strong Foundation. The new Bands For Freedom wristbands were created to bolster support for the war on terror and U.S. troops who sacrifice for freedom.
About Bands For Freedom Foundation Inc.

Created in 2004, Bands For Freedom has become an enormously popular supplier of patriotic silicone wristbands that come in red, white, blue and desert camouflage, as well as a marbled band with combinations of all three patriotic colors. The wristbands are marked with the word "FREEDOM" and are designed to aid Americans in making a respectful and unified statement in honor of the men and women of the armed forces. Bands For Freedom donates all after-cost proceeds to the Armed Forces Relief Trust fund.

Through Fan Bandz (a for-profit sister company to Bands For Freedom), interested parties can order customized silicone wristbands that can be used to build team unity, promote a cause and/or used for charitable and fund-raising purposes. Current Fan Bandz customers range from high schools, little league sports teams, non-profit charities, corporations and rock'n'roll bands.
About The Armed Forces Relief Trust

The Armed Forces Relief Trust is a unique non-profit fund created to collect donations for U.S. troops and their families. The AFRT raises money to support the men and women of the U.S. armed forces and their families and, unlike many other charitable organizations, distributes 100 percent of the money it raises among the five divisions of the U.S. military.




















Fan Bandz Create Colorful Affinity Silicone Wristbands to Bolster Support for Innumerable Good Causes
Business Wire, Feb 3, 2005
OREM, Utah -- Silicone wristbands prove to be useful in raising funds and awareness of important issues

Fan Bandz, a Utah-based business designed to help foster team spirit and camaraderie through custom silicone wristbands, today announced it has expanded its service and now offers wristbands to organizations across the nation.

"Affinity bands are becoming increasingly popular as people seek to support their favorite schools, teams, organizations and charities," said Steve Cloward, president and chief executive officer of Fan Bandz. "Organizations can turn around and sell the bands for a profit, with the proceeds going directly to their charity of choice."

For example, Fan Bandz recently provided wristbands for the American Red Cross to foster support for its ongoing work throughout the world.

"While primarily designed to raise funds, the bands will continue to work behind the scenes reminding those wearing them and others about the constant efforts of the Red Cross or any other organization that wishes to participate," Cloward said.

Other charities are also turning to Fan Bandz to develop awareness for their causes. The One Campaign, which seeks to rally support in fighting the emergency of global AIDS and extreme poverty, has also employed the services of Fan Bandz in the development of its own wristband.

Traditional businesses are also quickly becoming some of Fan Bandz's most regular clients. While most do not use the wristbands to raise money, the custom-made bands have proven extremely useful in fostering team unity and increased focus.

For example, Pharmanex, a global leader in the nutritional supplement industry, has created a Live Better, Longer wristband that customers and employees can wear to symbolize their personal commitment to healthy living. For each wristband purchased, Pharmanex will donate a bag of VitaMeal (a $20 value) in the name of the purchaser, which will provide life-sustaining nutrition to a child in Malawi for 30 days.

"We were surprised at how these bands seemed to bond people to our corporate culture," said John Beeson, senior marketing manager at Pharmanex. "It's like being in a club. We looked around at many other companies doing wristbands, and the Fan Bandz were a clear step above the rest in terms of quality and value."

4Life Research, a leading developer of natural immune support products, which was recognized in 2004 by Inc. magazine as the 15th fastest growing privately held company in America, has also used silicone wristbands to promote their cause and increase awareness about important health-related concerns and remedies.

Businesses can also use the wristbands to market the launch of a new product. Instead of just making t-shirts and pens, businesses can now create a silicone wristband featuring embossed product names, as well as the company's Web address.

Any organization with a cause to promote can use the Fan Bandz silicone wristband concept to increase attention and drive traffic to its Web site. Whether sponsoring a campaign for drug awareness, litter prevention, ethnic respect or any other worthy cause, Fan Bandz are a powerful marketing tool.

The wristbands come in both youth and adult. Colors can be selected from any PANTONE(R) color swatch from its solid color book, giving clients thousands of colors to choose from.

















Precision Dynamics Visa Band(R) Wristbands Launched for Red Ribbon Week Anti-Drug Campaign
Market Wire, September, 2006
Precision Dynamics Corporation (PDC), a leader in Auto ID wristband solutions, introduces new wristband designs for the national anti-drug campaign Red Ribbon Week. Schools and communities across the U.S. are gearing up for Red Ribbon Week, October 23-31, with a single purpose of helping youth make the choice and commitment for a healthy, drug-free lifestyle.

PDC Visa Band® wristbands are printed with slogans for a fun and positive way to complement schools' Red Ribbon Week programs. Students wear the wristbands as a positive reminder of their pledge to be drug-free.

PDC offers several styles of red wristbands for Red Ribbon Week along with new stock logo designs for 2006, including "I Like Me Drug Free," "100% Drug Free," and "Too Smart to Start." The wristbands are adjustable to fit all ages.

Visa Bands are durable and waterproof and can be worn for the entire week's observance. Vinyl VIP® wristbands are also available with optional reusable metal snap closures which allow students to wear and remove wristbands as needed.

Custom printing is offered to allow schools to print their name or logo on the wristbands to promote student pride and school spirit. Schools can also print a custom message to fit their individual Red Ribbon Week theme. With a cost of only nine to fifteen cents per wristband, PDC's Red Ribbon Week wristbands are an inexpensive alternative to silicone style wristbands which cost three to five times more.

About Precision Dynamics

With 50 years of experience, PDC is a global leader and pacesetter in the development of Auto ID wristband systems for healthcare, patron management, and law enforcement. The company introduced the first patient Bar Code ID Wristband, patented Smart Band® Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) Wristbands, the AgeBand® Age/ID Verification System, and PDC Smart Kiosk® Cashless RFID System. PDC is committed to 100% quality in service, design, and manufacturing and has ISO-9001: 2000 and ISO-13485: 2003 certification.



















'Freedom Bands' Generate Money, Support for Troops
National Guard, Jan 2005 by Cotton, Erika N
Supporters of the troops now have a fashionable way to do a little more for those serving overseas.

Two non-profit organizations, the Share Our Gifts Foundation and Freedombands, Inc., launched similar campaigns last year to honor, recognize and care for U.S. troops and their families.

Kib Jenson, of Provo, Utah, a former Air National Guardsman and president of Share Our Gifts, and his eldest son, Brady, 12, came up with the idea for the Freedomband one hot afternoon in August, while the two were working on a Boy Scout project.

Inspired by the success and popularity of Lance Armstrong's Livestrong bands, they created something similar.

Engraved on the red Freedomband are the words "Life, Liberty and Freedom," each word separated by stars. The Jenson family, including wife, Lisa, Stephanie, 14, Jacob, 10 and Justin, 9, fills orders out their home and have shipped more than 40,000 bands since early October.

"Whether or not you agree philosophically or politically with the wars and conflicts in which America is involved shouldn't matter," Jenson said. "All of us should honor the sacrifices of our brave men and women who serve or have served in the military. Every one of them gives something-some of them have given everything."

The family hopes to raise $25 million from sales and donations to give to A Million Thanks; the Air Force Aid Society; the Army Emergency Relief; the Fisher House Foundation; the Navy & Marine Corps Aid Society; the Red Cross and the United States Service Organization, all charities that support the troops and their families.

In December, another not-for-profit organization, Freedombands, Inc., donated $20,000 to the Armed Forces Relief Trust in support of the troops and their families. The company jumped on the wristband bandwagon in July, when it conceived the concept. The company has sold so far 87,000 bands, Freedomband, Inc. officials said.

The silicone wristbands come in red, white, blue, marbled with all three colors or desert camouflage.

Marked with the word " Freedom," they offer a simple yet powerful reminder of the sacrifices made each day to preserve the American way of life.

Freedomband, Inc.'s Freedom Bands cost one dollar and come in both youth and adult sizes, in packages of 10 for $10, or four packages of three with red, white, blue bands for $10.




















Bands For Freedom Foundation Tops $200,000 in Donations to the Armed Forces Relief Trust in Under Six Months; Nearly 50 Major Celebrities Add Their Support by Wearing Patriotic Wristbands
Business Wire, June 13, 2005
OREM, Utah -- The Bands For Freedom Foundation today announced it has donated more than $200,000 to the Armed Forces Relief Trust (AFRT) in the last six months since it began its donor partnership with the AFRT.

Since the beginning of the year, the Bands For Freedom Foundation has also made remarkable strides in securing 48 major celebrity endorsements from sports figures, music icons, actors and other influential people to support the cause of freedom on the heroes page. These celebrities have joined with hundreds of thousands of Americans in wearing the silicone wristbands in support of the U.S. troops as Independence Day approaches.

The Bands For Freedom Foundation is donating all after-cost revenue to the Armed Forces Relief Trust (AFRT) to help soldiers and their families. Its most recent donation, a hefty $100,000 check presented at TechNet International 2005's Washington gala banquet on May 17, 2005, at the Washington, D.C., Convention Center, brings its AFRT donation total to more than $200,000 since December 2004.

"With Independence Day around the corner, this is the opportune time to support freedom and to remember the men and women of the military," said Steve Cloward, chief executive officer of the Bands For Freedom Foundation. "We are always pleased to have celebrity endorsements, but the real proof of our success is the number of everyday Americans who proudly wear a wristband to show their patriotic spirit."

The AFRT assists soldiers and their families by helping them meet their basic monetary needs. The majority of the assistance given by the AFRT goes to help soldiers in crisis who have faced major medical emergencies either themselves or with a family member.

The Bands For Freedom Foundation recognizes this urgent need to support U.S. troops and has become a chief supporter of the AFRT. It donates 100 percent (after manufacturing and administrative costs) of the revenue it receives from sales of its patriotic silicone wristbands to support the U.S. troops via the AFRT.

The wristbands come in both youth and adult sizes, and are available in several colors (red, white, blue, patriotic marbling of red, white and blue together, and camouflage).

About Bands For Freedom Foundation Inc.

Created in 2004, Bands For Freedom follows the lead of its predecessor, Freedombands Inc., and has become an enormously popular supplier of patriotic silicone wristbands. The wristbands are marked with the word "FREEDOM" and are designed to aid Americans in making a respectful and unified statement in honor of the men and women of the armed forces. Bands For Freedom donates all after-cost proceeds to the Armed Forces Relief Trust fund.


















Stars of 'Yes, Dear' Wearing Bands For Freedom Wristbands; Celebrity Endorsements Continue to Roll in for the Men and Women in Uniform
Business Wire, April 26, 2005
OREM, Utah -- When Anthony Clark and Mike O'Malley of CBS' popular sitcom "Yes, Dear" heard of the Bands For Freedom Foundation's efforts to support U.S. troops, they added their support to Bands For Freedom and its Hero's Page, an online list of celebrity supporters for the Armed Forces Relief Trust (AFRT) and the men and women of the U.S. military.

Clark, who plays the neurotic Greg Warner in "Yes, Dear," has been a major part of the recent show's success. A previous "College Entertainer of the Year," he is a successful comedian whose former comedic performance led him to star in NBC's "Boston Common." He also appeared in the blockbuster action film, "The Rock," and is an ardent supporter of the U.S. troops.

O'Malley acts the part of Jimmy Hughes, Greg's baseball cap-wearing, blue-collar brother-in-law. Former host and producer of the Mike O'Malley Show, he has also appeared in several popular ESPN commercials as Rick, the overzealous Boston sports fan. O'Malley, who himself has written and produced several plays, recently played the part of Oliver in "28 Days" with Sandra Bullock.

"Yes, Dear," which TelevisionWeek praised for "taking chances" as it launched its fifth year, has become CBS' top performer on Monday nights. The show's success comes largely as a result of the conflicting parenting styles employed by Clark and O'Malley.

Other television and movie star supporters who have voiced their support for the U.S. troops and the AFRT by wearing Bands For Freedom silicone wristbands include Audrey from NBC's the "Apprentice 3"; Ernie Hudson, most recently seen in "Miss Congeniality 2"; Michael Keaton, star of "White Noise" and "First Daughter"; Kimberley Locke of "American Idol" fame; and Christina Milian, who recently performed in the comedy hit "Be Cool." These celebrities and many more can be seen wearing the Bands For Freedom silicone wristbands.

The wristbands come in both youth and adult sizes. Bands For Freedom wristbands are similar to those made popular by the Lance Armstrong Wear Yellow Live Strong Foundation. The new Bands For Freedom wristbands were created to bolster support for the war on terror and U.S. troops who sacrifice for freedom.

About Bands For Freedom Foundation Inc.

Created in 2004, Bands For Freedom follows the lead of its predecessor, Freedombands Inc., and has become an enormously popular supplier of patriotic silicone wristbands that come in red, white, blue and desert camouflage, as well as a marbled band with combinations of all three patriotic colors. The wristbands are marked with the word "FREEDOM" and are designed to aid Americans in making a respectful and unified statement in honor of the men and women of the armed forces. Bands For Freedom donates all after-cost proceeds to the Armed Forces Relief Trust fund.

About the Armed Forces Relief Trust

The Armed Forces Relief Trust is a unique non-profit fund created to collect donations for U.S. troops and their families. The AFRT raises money to support the men and women of the U.S. armed forces and their families and, unlike many other charitable organizations, distributes 100 percent of the money it raises among the five divisions of the U.S. military.




















Toby Keith Supports the U.S. Troops by Wearing Bands For Freedom Wristbands; Oklahoma's Patriotic Son is Standing up for the Men and Women in Uniform
Business Wire, April 19, 2005
OREM, Utah -- Bands For Freedom Foundation, Inc. today announced that country music superstar Toby Keith has joined the growing list of celebrity supporters for the Armed Forces Relief Trust (AFRT) and the men and women of the U.S. military.

Keith added his name to the Bands For Freedom Hero's Page, an online list of supporters for the U.S. troops via the Bands For Freedom Foundation and the AFRT. Other country music supporters include Charlie Daniels, Mark Wills and Darryl Worley.

One of the most recognizable country music stars in America today, Keith isn't afraid to show his patriotic roots, as has been evidenced by songs including "My List" and "Courtesy of the Red, White and Blue." Keith's honky-tonk style garnered national attention when "American Soldier," his patriotic salute to the men and women of the military, became the number one song in America over Independence Day weekend in 2002.

"Toby Keith is a great example of what we are trying to do here with Bands For Freedom," said Steve Cloward, president and chief executive officer of Bands For Freedom. "Keith has performed for the U.S. troops countless times and often travels to be with them for holidays. We are pleased to associate ourselves with such selfless and patriotic people in this great cause."

The wristbands come in both youth and adult sizes. Bands For Freedom wristbands are similar to those made popular by the Lance Armstrong Wear Yellow Live Strong Foundation. The new Bands For Freedom wristbands were created to bolster support for the war on terror and U.S. troops who sacrifice for freedom.

About Bands For Freedom Foundation Incorporated

Created in 2004, Bands For Freedom follows the lead of its predecessor, Freedombands, Inc., and has become an enormously popular supplier of patriotic silicone wristbands that come in red, white, blue and desert camouflage, as well as a marbled band with combinations of all three patriotic colors. The wristbands are marked with the word "FREEDOM" and are designed to aid Americans in making a respectful and unified statement in honor of the men and women of the armed forces. Bands For Freedom donates all after-cost proceeds to the Armed Forces Relief Trust fund.

About The Armed Forces Relief Trust

The Armed Forces Relief Trust is a unique non-profit fund created to collect donations for U.S. troops and their families. The AFRT raises money to support the men and women of the U.S. armed forces and their families and, unlike many other charitable organizations, distributes 100 percent of the money it raises among the five divisions of the U.S. military.



















Bands For Freedom Foundation Inc. and Military.com Introduce Camouflage Wristbands for Troops
Business Wire, March 7, 2005
OREM, Utah -- New camouflage wristbands can be worn by troops in fatigues out in the field

Bands For Freedom Foundation Inc. and Military.com today announced the Military.com silicone wristband. The new custom-designed camouflage wristbands are designed to bolster support for the men and women of the U.S. military and can be worn by soldiers in the field while dressed in battle fatigues, as well as by supporters here at home.

"Soldiers were wearing the normal red, white and blue Bands For Freedom while they were off duty, but when they were dressed in camouflage or out in the field, they weren't able to wear the brightly colored wristbands," said Steve Cloward, president and chief executive officer of Bands For Freedom. "We put our heads together with Military.com and created a camouflage band that soldiers can wear while they work."

Marked with the words "Support Our Troops," the Military.com wristbands were created to garner increased support for the war on terror and the troops who make sacrifices for our freedom. They are similar to those made popular by the Lance Armstrong Wear Yellow Live Strong Foundation, but resemble some of the modern hunting camouflage patterns and feature a blend of green, brown, tan and white.

Bands For Freedom and Military.com continue to support the troops by contributing all after-cost revenue from their wristband sales to the Armed Forces Relief Trust (AFRT). The Bands For Freedom Foundation Inc. has been one of the AFRT's most ardent contributors, having raised more than $100,000 for the organization.

Soldiers aren't the only ones who can wear the camouflage wristbands. Military.com is offering the bands to anyone interested in advancing the cause of freedom and supporting the U.S. troops. While being marketed mainly to the more than 4 million Military.com members, the bands are available to all. Soldiers and civilians alike can buy the bands.

About Bands For Freedom Foundation Inc.

Created in 2004, Bands For Freedom follows the lead of its predecessor, Freedombands Inc., and has become an enormously popular supplier of patriotic silicone wristbands. Designed to aid Americans in making a respectful and unified statement in honor of the men and women of the armed forces, Bands For Freedom donates all after-cost proceeds to the Armed Forces Relief Trust.

Military Advantage & Military.com

Founded in 1999, Military Advantage Inc. owns and operates Military.com, the largest online military destination serving 4 million members, including active duty personnel, reservists, guard members, retirees, veterans, family members, defense workers and those considering military careers. Military.com enables the 30 million Americans with military affinity to access their benefits, advance their careers, enjoy military discounts, and stay connected for life. Military Advantage develops efficient affinity marketing and communications programs for government agencies and companies serving this market. Military Advantage is a subsidiary of Monster Worldwide Inc. (Nasdaq: MNST). More information on the company is available online at www.military.com.

About The Armed Forces Relief Trust

The Armed Forces Relief Trust is a unique nonprofit fund created to collect donations for U.S. troops and their families. The AFRT has a proud history of providing needed funds for men and women of the armed forces and their families and, unlike many other charitable organizations, distributes 100 percent of the money it raises among the five divisions of the military. The AFRT helps soldiers and their families cover basic living expenses such as rent, food, utilities and car repairs, and offers interest-free loans and grants to help with bills while soldiers are away serving their country. Soldiers who must travel back to the United States for a funeral, the birth of a child or other emergencies can turn to the AFRT to access the money they need to travel.





















Thousands of Bands For Freedom Wristbands Welcome Sailors; Armed Forces Relief Trust Uses Patriotic Wristbands to Increase Awareness of Its Services
Business Wire, Jan 18, 2005
BREMERTON, Wash. -- When more than 3,000 sailors arrived in Bremerton, Wash. last week, they were greeted by family, friends, community members and thousands of Bands For Freedom wristbands.

The new Bands For Freedom wristbands were created to bolster support for the war on terror and the U.S. troops who sacrifice to preserve freedom. The wristbands are similar to those made popular by the Lance Armstrong Wear Yellow Live Strong Foundation.

"We were pleased to take part in this welcome gala for these sailors and their families," said Steve Cloward, president and chief executive officer of the Bands For Freedom Foundation Inc. "Bands For Freedom will continue to support the troops by contributing to the Armed Forces Relief Trust (AFRT). Spreading the Bands For Freedom wristbands to people all over the country is our way of saying thanks to the troops, both at home and abroad."

The community in Bremerton organized a homecoming party to welcome the sailors from the USS Stennis. The Stennis is a new aircraft carrier and will be replacing the Carl Vinson, which was sent to Norfolk, Va. for an overhaul and routine reactor check. As part of the festivities, the AFRT presented the sailors and their families with thousands of Bands For Freedom wristbands and educated the new arrivals about its financial services and assistance capabilities.

The AFRT has a proud history of providing needed funds for soldiers on active duty. To help soldiers cover basic living expenses such as rent, food, utilities and car repairs, the AFRT offers interest-free loans and grants. Soldiers and their families can also apply for interest-free loans from the AFRT to help with bills while their family is away serving their country. Soldiers who must travel back to the United States for a funeral, the birth of a child or other emergencies can turn to the AFRT to access the money they need to travel.

"We wanted the sailors to know that we are here for them if they fall on hard times," said Candy Strickland, chairman of volunteers for the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society, the division of the AFRT that deals with naval personnel. "Often times soldiers struggle for months without even knowing that there are resources out there to help them get back on their feet. We want people to understand who we are and what we do. We may just be the last resort for many of our men and women in uniform."

The Bands For Freedom Foundation Inc. has been one of the AFRT's most ardent contributors. After raising more than $30,000 for the AFRT, the creators of Bands For Freedom wristbands have pledged to continue to donate all after-cost revenue from the sale of its colorful patriotic wristbands to support the U.S. troops.

The Bands For Freedom wristbands come in both youth and adult sizes. Non-profit organizations, clubs, teams and other groups can buy the wristbands at wholesale prices and sell them for a profit.

About Bands For Freedom Foundation Inc.

Created in 2004, Bands For Freedom follows the lead of its predecessor, Freedombands Inc., and has become an enormously popular supplier of patriotic silicone wristbands. The smartly designed silicone wristbands, that come in red, white, blue, or a marbled band with all three colors and are marked with the word "FREEDOM," offer a simple yet powerful reminder of the sacrifices made to preserve freedom for all people. Designed to aid Americans in making a respectful and unified statement in honor of the men and women of the armed forces, Bands For Freedom donates all after-cost proceeds to the Armed Forces Relief Trust.

About The Armed Forces Relief Trust

The Armed Forces Relief Trust is a unique non-profit fund created to collect donations for U.S. troops and their families. The AFRT raises money to support the men and women of the U.S. armed forces and their families and, unlike many other charitable organizations, distributes 100 percent of the money it raises among the five divisions of the U.S. military.




















Tsunami Relief Wristbands Announced By Look To Him, LLC.; Sales from New Wristbands Go to Support Red Cross Relief Efforts
Business Wire, Jan 12, 2005
PROVO, Utah -- Look To Him, LLC. today announced new tsunami relief wristbands designed to bolster continued support for the relief efforts in Southeast Asia.

Look To Him is a newly formed company specifically designed to provide a method to contribute to the relief effort and foster increased spiritual and temporal support for the victims of the recent tsunami in Southeast Asia. One dollar out of every silicone wristband sold will go directly to the American Red Cross relief fund to support the reconstruction efforts in the region.

Each wristband sports the letters WWJD (standing for What Would Jesus Do?), a popular acronym that reminds Christians everywhere of their responsibility to care for their neighbors and to emulate Jesus in their everyday actions. The wristbands come in navy blue, forest green, white and a transparent color that glows in the dark, and are available in sizes for adults, youth and children. The WWJD wristbands can be purchased at www.LooktoHIM.com.

"People of compassion everywhere have been overwhelmed with sadness and grief for the massive devastation suffered in Southeast Asia as a result of the earthquake and subsequent tsunami," said Dee Oldroyd, president and chief executive officer of Look To Him. "The new WWJD bands from LookToHIM.com offer an opportunity to help the millions of people in need in that region."

Half a world away from the locations of these awful tragedies, people have looked for a way to offer assistance, but they have not known how. Now they will be able to reach out and help those whose lives have been changed forever and show their solidarity with their brothers and sisters from across the globe. The founders of Look To Him hope that, in a small way, this will help to ease the suffering of those in Asia and Africa whose lives have been changed so dramatically by this natural disaster.

About Look To Him, LLC

Created in December 2004, Look To Him, LLC. is a company designed to build awareness of worldwide moral issues and urge people of faith everywhere to join together in the spirit of brotherhood and bless the lives of every living being on earth.


















Bands For Freedom Foundation Inc. Receives Strong Support From High-Profile Celebrities; Patriotic Wristbands Offer a Way for Everyone to Support the U.S. Troops
Business Wire, Jan 4, 2005
OREM, Utah -- Senator Orrin Hatch isn't the only well-known supporter of the Bands For Freedom Foundation Inc.

Bands For Freedom today announced that it is receiving support from several well-known celebrities in its efforts to raise funds for the Armed Forces Relief Trust (AFRT) and the men and women in uniform.

On the Jan. 3 Tonight Show with Jay Leno, the popular rock band Bowling for Soup played their hit single "1985." During their performance lead singer Jaret Reddick took the opportunity to show off his red, white and blue Bands For Freedom wristbands while pointing across the set to Jay Leno. Bowling for Soup backs the Bands For Freedom Foundation and the U.S. troops.

Another major supporter of Bands For Freedom is Olympic gold medalist Rulon Gardner, who recently competed in his first Pride Fighting Championship in Tokyo. Gardner fought Japan's gold medalist judo legend Hidehiko Yoshida and soundly beat him, earning Gardner his first Pride Fighting Championship victory. Gardner is a staunch supporter of Bands For Freedom and is himself a prime example of American heroism.

Superstars like Vanessa Carlton and Christina Milian wear Bands For Freedom wristbands and are vocal supporters as well. While celebrities continue to add their names to the growing list of supporters, Bands For Freedom wants to extend that same opportunity to everyone, regardless of celebrity status.

"Anyone can do this, which is what we think is so great about these wristbands," said Steve Cloward, president and chief executive officer of Bands For Freedom. "You don't have to be a millionaire or a movie star, you just have to recognize the great service being done by the troops and then support them by wearing the Bands For Freedom wristbands."

Wearing the new Bands For Freedom wristbands supports the U.S. troops in two ways. First, after covering the costs of manufacturing and administration, the creators of Bands For Freedom are donating 100 percent of its revenue to the Armed Forces Relief Trust (AFRT) to aid soldiers and their families.

The AFRT has a proud history of providing needed funds for soldiers in crisis. Soldiers who must travel back to the United States for a funeral, the birth of a child or other emergency can turn to the AFRT to access the money they need to travel. Soldiers and their families can also apply for interest-free loans from the AFRT to help with bills while their family is away serving their country.

The second way Bands For Freedom supports the U.S. troops is slightly more subtle. When people wear the Bands For Freedom wristbands it is a quiet way for them to show their appreciation for the sacrifices made each day to preserve our freedom. The Bands For Freedom wristbands are marked with the word "FREEDOM," they offer a simple yet powerful reminder to everyone who sees them or wears them of the valiant efforts of the military to preserve the American way of life.

Bands For Freedom wristbands are smartly designed silicone bands that come in red, white and blue, as well as a marbled band with all three colors, and are similar to those made popular by the Lance Armstrong Wear Yellow Live Strong Foundation. According to the Lance Armstrong Foundation, more than 20 million Live Strong Wristbands(TM) have been purchased. The new Bands For Freedom wristbands were created to bolster support for the war on terror and our troops who sacrifice for freedom.

The wristbands come in both youth and adult sizes. Non-profit organizations, clubs, teams and other groups can buy the Bands For Freedom wristbands at wholesale prices and sell them for a profit.

About Bands For Freedom Foundation Inc.

Created in 2004, Bands For Freedom follows the lead of its predecessor, Freedombands Inc., and has become an enormously popular supplier of patriotic silicone wristbands. Designed to aid Americans in making a respectful and unified statement in honor of the men and women of the armed forces, Bands For Freedom donates all after-cost proceeds to the Armed Forces Relief Trust.

About the Armed Forces Relief Trust

The Armed Forces Relief Trust is a unique non-profit fund created to collect donations for U.S. troops and their families. The AFRT raises money to support the men and women of the U.S. armed forces and their families and, unlike many other charitable organizations, distributes 100 percent of the money it raises among the five divisions of the U.S. military.

















Protect iPod with pretty wrappers
Deseret News (Salt Lake City), Dec 24, 2006 by Brice Wallace Deseret Morning News
LOGAN -- That iPod you're going to get as a Christmas gift has been in a box under the tree for days, if not weeks. And once you open it, a Logan company hopes you quickly put a different type of wrapper on it.

A start-up subsidiary of Reminderband Inc. called ifrogz offers a variety of protective cases for iPods. While they have plastic and aluminum cases, their hallmark three-component product is made of silicone. The various mixes of colors for each component add up to 300,000 variations to personalize that iPod, and a new tool allows people to put custom images on a decal for the device's click- wheel.

"We've scratched our heads about that, because Apple puts out two colors of iPods," said Clay Broadbent, senior vice president. "So we thought, 'Hey, nobody's playlist is the same, so why should your player look the same?"'

A basic ifrogz set, costing $29, consists of a transparent plastic cover for the iPod face and a decal for the click-wheel (those are called "screenz"). The silicone case, called "wrapz," stretches to cover the majority of the iPod, with openings for the click-wheel and screen. A silicone strip called "bandz" is placed along the top, bottom and sides, with only a hole for the earphones, although it can be pulled back to plug stuff into the iPod ports.

"A lot of soldiers in Iraq like it because it keeps out the sand," Broadbent said. "If you're going to drop $300 or $350 on something like that, you want to protect it as much as you can. That was part of the whole idea."

Ifrogz offers about 40 colors of wrapz and bandz and more than 200 stock designs for the click-wheel decal.

"Nanos now come in a few colors, and there are a few other case companies that have different colors, but none even come close to 40," Broadbent said.

The whole ifrogz concept spun from the highly successful Reminderband product line. Broadbent and Scott Huskinson, president and CEO, got into the customized silicone wristband field in late 2004. While several other companies were doing the same thing -- Lance Armstrong's "Livestrong" bands helped the market take off -- Reminderband found a niche by offering small production runs and small start-up fees for customers. With customers able to order as few as 20 bands sporting custom phrases, the response "exploded" after the company's Web site went active in November 2004, Broadbent said.

In 2005, the company sold about 9 million of the wristbands.

"But the thought, right from Day One, was that we knew that silicone wristbands weren't going to be a hot product forever. We didn't know if it would be three weeks, three months, three years -- we didn't know -- but we knew it wouldn't be the end-all. So the structure we put together as an online company was a framework so we could put other products into that pipeline," Broadbent said.

The company used its expertise in the silicone business and worked to capitalize on the hot-selling iPod trend.

"We saw some cases that were silicone cases but not with a lot of pizazz," he said. "Usually there's black, there's clear and there's white. We thought, let's infuse some fun into it. And then that developed into, well, let's let customers design their own.

"We knew we came in late to the case game. IPods came out in 2001, and we thought, here we are, just getting into the game. But we got very positive feedback on the initial prototypes and the concept, so we thought we'd give it a try. The iPod accessory market is huge, so we looked at it and said that if we can capture a small percentage of that market, we could probably do OK."

Sales of ifrogz products are "not as crazy" as sales were for Reminderband when it began, but ifrogz is selling "hundreds of cases per day" through its Web site that started in March of this year, he said.

"We're not huge, but we are profitable," Broadbent said. "We're a relative unknown. ... We know that we're a small fish in a big pond, and we're working to get the word out about us."

Ifrogz has tried to set itself apart from the competition by offering high-quality cases. One attribute is an anti-dust treatment "baked" into the silicone, Broadbent said.

And ifrogz offers more than silicone, such as faux leather and ballistic nylon cases; leather cases; a line tooled to look like giraffe, zebra and crocodile skin; a waterproof bag for keeping items dry at the beach or on boats; a wristband to hold the iPod Shuffle; Clamz plastic iPod cases; and an aluminum version called Canz.

One product is called the Tadpole. With carrying handles on each side, it's a colorful video iPod case designed for young children, providing parents with a dose of protection for their expensive devices.

"It's amazing the little kids -- 4-year-olds and 5-year-olds -- that will get ahold of this and sit still and watch, even with everything going on around them," Broadbent said.

As for personalization, the company recently began offering an online Screenz Creator, allowing customers to put any design or photo on their click-wheel for $14.99. Copyrighted, obscene or offensive images are not allowed, but customers can, say, put a picture of their pet on their iPod. Businesses can put corporate logos there, or schools can create mascot images.

Both reviewers and customers have been smitten with ifrogz' offerings. Yahoo! Tech named ifrogz iPod cases the No. 3 holiday gift for "tech-lovin' teens," ranked behind only the expensive black 80-gigabyte video iPod and the T-Mobile Sidekick 3 and two spots ahead of the flashy Nintendo Wii gaming system.

A reviewer at ABC News said the case is "the most rugged and creative of all the cases we have reviewed. ... This case is a 10 out of 10."

"The unique overall design and color choices make my iPod stand out and everybody asks what it is and I am thrilled to tell them 'ifrogz,"' a Wisconsin man wrote the company.

Ifrogz, like Reminderband, is currently an online operation, and the two have a combined team of about 24 in Logan. Manufacturing is done in China, and a Hong Kong office ships them out. The company's products are offered at a few e-tailers' sites, plus a few kiosks and carts in shopping malls across the country, such as Cache Valley Mall in Logan, Fashion Place in Murray and Provo Towne Centre.

Ifrogz might expand in the retail space. It's putting together a "multipack" that retailers can offer. It would include one case, a screen protector, three colors of bands and likely 10 of the click- wheel art designs, all for about $30.

"With that, I can make my case look 30 different ways with just this one product, right out of the box," Broadbent said. "We hope we'll knock some people's socks off."

The company is developing a line of headphones, including some for the Tadpole, a case for the Microsoft Zune, a double-thick- silicone case for heavy-duty use and other products.

"We really think the Reminderband business will be around in some form. We still sell between 8,000 and 20,000 bands a day, still. ... I think bands will still be around because 'Bobbi Sue at the middle school' can buy bands for her small group if she wants. That product is unique and customizable and that will be a product that will be around. Will we sell 9 million, 10 million a year? I don't think so. But it's got legs," Broadbent said.

"I say the same thing about ifrogz. I really think it will be around. It's a unique product, and it's a very hard product for our competitors to get into. ... We're small enough that we can adapt, and we've had that mind-set from the beginning, to be adaptable to the different trends, and we have a lot of stuff on the drawing board."

Five years from now, he expects Reminderband and ifrogz to provide a few more offerings for customers and even more fun for those at the company.

"It's a fun product," he said of ifrogz. "That's one of the fun things, when you get up to work in the morning, you're like, what can we think of today? We know we've put a fun product out there.

"It's been great. It's been a great ride and it continues to be a great ride, and we continue to evolve as a company. We started with two guys, two cell phones and a storage shed. Here we are today, and we'll see where it takes us."





















Utahns are pitching in to help hurricane victims
Deseret News (Salt Lake City), Sep 2, 2005
Groups around Utah are working to aid Hurricane Katrina victims. Among them are:

-- The Downtown Alliance will accept donations to benefit the American Red Cross Saturday from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Downtown Farmers' Market. A booth will be set up in the center of Pioneer Park (300 South and 300 West). Donations can be made with cash, personal check or business check.

-- Best Friends Animal Society is trying to reunite pets with their Gulf State owners. The Kanab-based facility will work with local officials and animal rescue groups to assist animals who were left behind or lost during the hurricane.

-- Every dollar donated by the nearly 300 employees of Sandy- based Harman Music Group will be matched by parent company Harman International. The fund-raising effort will continue for a month, but the Utah division of the global corporation has designated today as the main push for funds.

The campaign is at the direction of company founder Sidney Harman, who ran a similar company effort following the devastating Asian tsunami late last year and personally donated $1 million to the cause, said Sharon Howard, human resources director at Harman Music Group.

"Bless his sweet heart, the man is over 80, but he's always the first person in line to pitch in and help," she said.

All funds raised will go directly to the American Red Cross National Disaster Relief Fund.

-- Inmates at the Utah State Prison are competing to see who can donate the most money. So far, more than $1,000 has been raised from about 200 inmates with more money to come, Department of Corrections spokesman Jack Ford said.

The inmates housed in Lone Peak decided to raise some money and came up with about $500. When the women, housed in Timpanogos, found out, they decided to try to outdo the men, ending up with $560. Now, inmates in Wasatch and Oquirrh units are contributing money, Ford said.

-- A semitrailer truck stocked with 22 pallets of food, including bottled water, energy drinks and nutrition bars, departed from the Utah Food Bank Thursday afternoon for the Gulf Coast. The food bank is not accepting food donations for hurricane victims because of the logistical challenges of collecting, sorting and distributing the items. Rather, it encourages that monetary donations be made online at www.secondharvest.org.

-- The Utah Apartment Association is responding to a call from the Department of Homeland Security to supply a list of all available properties that could be used to house hurricane evacuees.
-- The Regence Group, which includes Regence BlueCross BlueShield of Utah, donated $100,000 to the American Red Cross Thursday and is encouraging its employees to donate to local Red Cross organizations as well.

-- Oktoberfest visitors can tack an extra dollar or two on their purchase of bratwurst and beer now through Oct. 9, and Snowbird will match the contribution to the American Red Cross. Donations can be made on all purchases at Snowbird Ski & Summer Resort, from lodging to food, and will be matched up to $10,000.

-- Motorcycle enthusiasts can show their support by attending a Sept. 17 benefit concert in Moab. The concert, featuring local country singer J. Marc Bailey and the female pop group Taja, is scheduled for the second day of the Iron Horse Rally in Moab.

Bailey is formerly of the group River Ranch, which played at the Governor's Ball during the 2002 Winter Olympics and has opened for country stars Toby Keith and Gary Allen, said organizer Deston Rogers of Rogers Entertainment Promotions.

"We may only raise $100, but we're going to give it the best effort we can," Rogers said. "It doesn't matter if it's $1 or $1,000, it all makes a difference. This is about people helping people. Americans coming together for Americans."

-- Purple, yellow and green silicone wristbands bearing the words "Katrina Relief" are available. Logan-based Reminderband will donate all proceeds to the American Red Cross and hopes to raise $10 million for hurricane relief efforts.

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